Organic Matters – Women to Watch

UPDATE – 11/18/2014

Rachel Sussman has been chosen as the GNYC Women to Watch nominee artist to be shown in Washington in the Women to Watch exhibition in June 2015.


 

Women to Watch is an exhibition program, held every two to three years, developed specifically for NMWA’s national and international outreach committees. Each of these exhibitions features emerging and underrepresented women artists from the states and countries in which the museum has outreach committees.

The program is designed to increase the visibility of—and critical response to—promising women artists who are deserving of national and international attention. In addition, the program is aimed at involving high quality art professionals, with diverse areas of expertise, in the committees’ activities. All active committees are invited to participate in this program. Women to Watch provides an excellent opportunity to highlight the range and vibrancy of women artists working throughout the country, and the world at large, and bring them more visibility at NMWA.

Each exhibition focuses on a specific medium and/or theme chosen by the museum’s curators. The program began in 2008, and the initial exhibition highlighted photographic works. The second installment (2010) focused on figure painting while the third (2012) highlighted contemporary textile based works. Participating artists have included Elisa Sighicelli (Great Britain, 2008), Zoe Strauss (Pennsylvania, 2008), Valérie Belin(France, 2008), Rose Wylie (Great Britain, 2010), Hannah Barrett (Massachusetts, 2010), Jennifer Levonian (Pennsylvania, 2010), Mequitta Ahuja (Texas, 2010), Ligia Bouton (New Mexico, 2012), Beili Liu (Texas, 2012), Tracy Krumm (Greater Kanasas City Area, 2012), and Laure Tixier (France, 2012). For your reference, information on Women to Watch 2012 can be found at www.nmwa.org/exhibitions/high-fiber.

Organic Matters – Women to Watch 2015 will illuminate how contemporary artists re-contextualize images of plants and animals to reflect upon the themes of sexuality, gender politics, and the abject. Nature-based imagery created by sculptors, painters, photographers, and video artists extends the Romantic-era idea that the mysterious and uncontrollable power of nature serves as an apt metaphor for the persistent unruliness of human culture.

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